Photograph of the trilobite Elrathia kingi from the Cambrian of Utah. The trilobite has a short, broad head with short spines projecting backwards off the side. The remainder of the body is made up of short, broad segments. The trilobite has no other spines. The animal is about 2.5 to 3 centimeters long.

Fossils of the Basin and Range

Simple map showing the area of the Basin and Range province of the southwestern United States.

Page snapshot: Introduction to the fossils of the Basin and Range region of the southwestern United States.


Topics covered on this page: Paleozoic fossils; Cambrian fossils; Ordovician fossils; Silurian fossils; Carboniferous fossils; Permian fossils; Mesozoic fossilsCenozoic fossils; White Sands National Park; Resources.

Credits: Most of the text on this page comes from "Fossils of the Southwestern US" by Warren D. Allmon and Richard A. Kissel, chapter 3 in the The Teacher-Friendly Guide to the Earth Science of the Southwestern USedited by Andrielle N. Swaby, Mark D. Lucas, and Robert M. Ross (published in 2016 by the Paleontological Research Institution; currently out of print). The book was adapted for the web by Elizabeth J. Hermsen and Jonathan R. Hendricks in 2022. Changes include formatting and revisions to the text and images. Credits for individual images are given in figure captions.

Updates: Page last updated April 13, 2022.

Image above: A trilobite (Elrathia kingi) from the Middle Cambrian Wheeler Shale, House Range, Millard County, Utah. Scale in millimeters. Photo of YPM IP 236840 by Jessica Utrup, 2021 (Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History/YPM, CC0 1.0 Universal/Public Domain Dedication, accessed via GBIF.org).

Paleozoic fossils

Cambrian fossils

Trilobites are extremely abundant and diverse in west-central Utah, in the middle Cambrian rocks exposed in the House Range of Millard County. One of these trilobite species is especially familiar: Elrathia kingii (see the image at the top of this page) is one of the most abundant trilobite species found in North America and is commonly sold commercially. Utah’s middle Cambrian rocks (especially the Wheeler Formation) also contain fossils of sponges, brachiopods, and echinoderms, as well as soft-bodied organisms like ctenophores (comb jellies), jellyfish, worms, and arthropods similar to those of the famous Burgess Shale in British Columbia, Canada. Such exceptional preservation was possible in part because these rocks formed from marine sediments deposited in anoxic (very low-oxygen) conditions.

Cambrian-aged to Ordovician-aged fossils are also common in the rocks of southern Arizona (especially Cochise County) and in southwestern and south-central New Mexico. In New Mexico, the Bliss Formation contains at least 19 species of trilobites as well as numerous brachiopods and conodonts.


4-Panel image of trilobites from the Cambrian of Utah. Panel 1: A short, oval-shaped trilobite with rounded front and back and few segments. Panel 2: A trilobite that is several centimeters long with a short, broad head and pygidium. Between, there are about 10 segments. Panel 3: A trilobite with a short, broad head and a body that tapers toward the pygidium (back end). Panel 4: A poorly preserved trilobite that is roughly oval in shape with distinct short spines projecting from the sides and back of the body. All the trilobites are small (less than 1 centimeter to several centimeters long.)

Trilobites from the Cambrian of Utah. Left to right: A) Agnostus interstrictus (YPM IP 325484), Middle Cambrian Wheeler Formation, Juab County. B) Asaphiscus wheeleri (YPM IP 527865), Middle Cambrian Wheeler Formation, Millard County. C) Alokistocare idahoense (YPM IP 428836), Middle Cambrian Langston Dolomite (Spence Shale), Box Elder County. D) Kootenia (YPM IP 200359), Middle Cambrian Wheeler Shale, Drum Mountains, Millard County. All photos by Jessica Utrup (Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History/YPM, CC0 1.0 Universal/Public Domain Dedication, accessed via GBIF.org).


2-Panel photograph of fossil sponges from the Cambrian of Utah. Panel 1: Photo showing two sponges. The sponges have an elongated, figure-like shape. The surface fo each sponge is made up of star-shaped structures. Panel 2: Close-up of the surface of one of the sponges showing star-shaped structures.

Fossil sponge (Chancelloria) from the Cambrian Wheeler Shale, Millard County, Utah. Left: Two fossil sponges. Right: Detail of one of the fossil sponges in the first image, showing star-shaped spicules. Photo of specimen YPM IP 217842 by Jessica Utrup, 2016 (Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History/YPM, CC0 1.0 Universal/Public Domain Dedication, accessed via GBIF.org).


2-Panel image of fossils echinoderms from the Cambrian of Utah. Each specimen has a cone-shaped calyx with many small radiating arms coming from the top. The specimen in the left image also has a short, stout stalk. Scale bars show specimens are several centimeters long.

An echinoderm (Gogia) from the Middle Cambrian of Utah. Left: Gogia granulosa (YPM IP 530446) from the Spence Shale, Wellsville Mountains. Right: Gogia (YPM IP 530493) from the Wheeler Shale, Millard County. Photos by Jessica Utrup (Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History/YPM, CC0 1.0 Universal/Public Domain Dedication, accessed via GBIF.org).


2-panel figure of a fossil jellyfish from the Cambrian of Utah. Panel 1: Photograph of a single specimen with a half-circle-shaped upper part and numerous short, narrow tentacles hanging down. Right: Line drawing of the same specimen. Scale bar indicates that the specimen is less than 1 centimeter wide.

A jellyfish from the Middle Cambrian Marjum Formation, House Range, Utah. Left: Photo of specimen. Right: Drawing of the same specimen. Scale = 0.5 cm (about 0.2 inches). Source: Figure 3 from Cartwright et al. (2007) PLoS ONE 2(10): e1121 (Creative Common Attribution license, image resized).


2-Panel image showing photos of a fossil worm from the Cambrian of Utah. Panels show part and counterpart of the same specimen. The worm is preserved in an S-shape and a dark line can be seen on its body.

Worm (Ottoia) from the Cambrian Wheeler Shale, Millard County, Utah (part and counterpart of same specimen shown). Photo of specimen YPM IP 204289 by Jessica Utrup, 2021 (Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History/YPM, CC0 1.0 Universal/Public Domain Dedication, accessed via GBIF.org).


3-panel image of the soft-bodied arthropod Thelixiope from the Cambrian of Utah. Panels 1 and 2 show the part and counterpart of a single specimen. The animal has a spine that is as long as or longer than its body extending from the top of its head. The body behind the head is made up of segments, each with one prominent spine projecting from the top. Specimens are several centimeters long. The third panel is a drawing showing how the arthropod may have appeared in life.

Soft-bodied arthropod (Thelixiope spinulosa) from the Middle Cambrian Wheeler Shale, House Range, Utah. Left: Part and counterpart of the same fossil specimen (one image flipped so that they are facing the same direction). Notice the long spine on the head and the body segments with spines. Right: Reconstruction of the living animal. Images from Figure 5 and Figure 8 in Lerosey-Aubril et al. (2020) PeerJ 8:e8879 (Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license, images modified).


Photograph of a fossil of a radiodont from the Cambrian of Utah. The fossil is reddish and preserved on a whitish rock. The animal has a round head with bristly-looking appendages attached to its underside. The remainder of the body is made up of rectangular segments with paddle-like appendages extending from the side of each segment. The animal is probably over 10 centimeters long.

A hurdiid radiodont (Buccaspinea cooperi) from the Middle Cambrian Marjum Formation, House Range, Millard County, Utah. Source: Figure 2 in Pates et al. (2021) PeerJ 9:e10509 (Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license, image cropped and resized).

Color drawing of a radiodont from the Cambrian of Utah. The animal has a slightly elongated head with bristly appendages curving slightly downward off the front underside. Underneath the head is a round mounth-like structure. The eyes extend from the sides in the top-back of the head. The remainder of the body is made up of repeating segments, each with short spines projecting off either side towards the top and paddle-like extensions attaching off each side toward the bottom. The animal has no legs.

Reconstruction of a hurdiid radiodont (Peytoia nathorsti), which is known from from the Middle Cambrian Wheeler Shale and the Midde Cambrian Marjum Formation of Utah. Reconstruction by Junnn11 (Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license).


Ordovician fossils

The early Ordovician El Paso Formation and overlying Montoya Formation extend from southern Arizona and New Mexico into western Texas. More than 400 species of marine invertebrates have been reported from these two units, including trilobites, corals, brachiopods, bryozoans, nautiloids, gastropods, graptolites, and the oldest known crinoids in the world. Ordovician rocks also occur in scattered outcrops across west-central and northwest Utah, and contain some of the most diverse and best preserved marine assemblages of this age anywhere in the world.


Photograph of a graptolite from the Ordovician of Utah. The grapolite looks like it has a central axis or midvein with lateral arching structures coming off the side. The edges of the graptolite look serrate. A scale is not indicated.

A graptolite (Phyllograptus typus), Middle Ordovician, Ibex Springs, Utah. Photo by James St. John (flickr, Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license, image cropped).


Photograph of a crinoid from the Ordovician of Utah. The specimen appears to preserve only the arms, with the ends of the arms on the left and the bases on the right. The arms are made up of a series of segments or plates. The scale bar is in millimeters (specimen probably around 2 to 3 centimeters long).

A crinoid (Ibexocrinus lepton) from the Ordovician Kanosh Shale, Millard County, Utah. Photo of USNM PAL 165239 by Crinoid Type Project (Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, public domain).


Photograph of an Orodvician crinoid from Utah. The fossil is deep red-brown and consists of may radiating arms. The specimen is oriented horizontally, with the base to the right and the tips of the arms to the left.

A crinoid (Pogocrinus antiquus) from the Ordovician Fillmore Limestone, Millard County, Utah. Photo of USNM PAL 249643 by Crinoid Type Image Project (Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, public domain).


Silurian fossils

Silurian-aged rocks are much less abundant in the Basin and Range than are older or younger rocks. In Millard County, Utah, Silurian rocks contain corals and brachiopods. In southern New Mexico and central Arizona, middle and late Devonian deposits contain abundant and diverse marine fossils, especially brachiopods, corals, and bryozoans.

Carboniferous fossils

Mississippian fossils

Carboniferous rocks in the Basin and Range represent an archipelago of warm, shallow seaways and uplifted islands. The Mississippian Escabrosa Limestone in south-central Arizona is similar to the Grand Canyon’s Redwall Limestone. Although many fossils in the Escabrosa are not as well preserved as those in the Redwall, the unit still contains abundant crinoids, mollusks, bivalves, brachiopods, corals, bryozoans, and foraminifera. Mississippian marine invertebrates are also abundant in Utah.


Photograph of a crinoid from the Mississippian of Utah. The crinoid is preserved on a medium brown stone. The stalk is on the right and the calyx and arms on left. The specimen arcs from one side to the other in the figure. It is probably in the range of 10 centimeters long.

A crinoid (Bridgerocrinus jamisoni) from the Mississippian Henderson Canyon Formation, Logan Canyon, northern Utah, near the border between the Basin and Range and Rocky Mountain physiographic provinces. Photo of USNM PAL 487224 by Crinoid Type Project (Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, public domain).


Photograph of a chunk of dark brown rock containing large rugose corals from the Mississippian of Utah. The corals are off-white in color, solitary, randomly oriented, and horn-shaped. A 3 centimeter scale bar is on one corner of the rock.

Rugose corals or horn corals (Turbophyllum) from the Mississippian Great Blue Limestone, Cache Canyon, northern Utah, near the border between the Basin and Range and Rocky Mountain physiographic provinces. Photos of YPM IP 529539 by Jessica Utrup, 2015 (Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History/YPM, CC0 1.0 Universal/Public Domain Dedication, via GBIF.org).


Pennsylvanian fossils

There is a strong Pennsylvanian fossil record in New Mexico. Fusulinids (a type of large foraminiferan that dwells on the seafloor) are the most important group for biostratigraphy in the Carboniferous and Permian rocks of the Basin and Range. More than 200 species of these creatures have been described from Pennsylvanian and Permian rocks in the Big Hatchet Mountains of Hidalgo County in southwestern New Mexico.

Other Pennsylvanian marine invertebrates found in the Basin and Range include corals, bryozoans, gastropods, bivalves, trilobites, and (as usual) brachiopods. The Pennsylvanian Naco Formation near Payson, Arizona (just south of the southern edge of the Colorado Plateau) also contains the teeth of many types of fossil sharks. Nonmarine Pennsylvanian fossils in central and southern New Mexico include freshwater fishes, plants, and insects, as well as terrestrial amphibians and reptiles.


Photograph of a fusilinid from the Pennsylvanian of New Mexico. The fusilinid is brown and roughly barrel-shaped (rounded in the middle and tapering slightly towards the ends). The fusilinid is several millimeters in length.

Fusilinids (Triticites rhodesi) from the Pennsylvanian of Socorro County, New Mexico. The scale bar is 1 millimeter (0.04 inches). Photo of USNM PAL 101122 by Loren Petruny (Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, public domain).


2-panel image showing large fusilinid fossils from the Pennsylvanian of New Mexico in section. Both photos show fusiform structures (structures that taper at the sides) made up of a concentric series of shell layers.

Fusilinids from the Pennsylvanian Horquilla Limstone, Hildago County, New Mexico. These fossils have been sectioned, meaning that they have been cut into thin slices so that their structure can be observed under a microscope. Left: Triticites inflatusRight: Triticites pinguis. Photos of specimens NMMNH P-52892 and P-52943 by New Mexico Museum of Natural History Collections Digitization (via Arctos, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license, images cropped and resized).


Permian fossils

As the ocean receded from the Southwest during the Permian, the Basin and Range transitioned to a mainly terrestrial environment. Marine sediments are exposed in a few places. Red beds in the Los Pinos Mountains of Socorro County, New Mexico, contain abundant fossil lungfish burrows, and Permian outcrops in western Utah contain fusulinids, conodonts, bivalves, and brachiopods.


3-panel image of a Permian brachiopod from Arizona. Panel 1: View of upper valve (part of shell). The valve is highly convex and has ribs and broken spines. Panel 2: View of underside, which is slightly concave. Panel 3: View of hinge. The shell looks somewhat hat-shaped in this view. Shell more than 3 centimeters wide (probably about 5 centimeters).

A brachiopod (Dictyoclostus ivesi), Late Permian Concha Limestone, Whetstone Mountains, Cochise County, Arizona. From left to right: Top, underside, hinge. Photos of YPM IP 41020 by Jessica Utrup, 2011 (Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History/YPM, CC0 1.0 Universal/Public Domain Dedication, via GBIF.org).


In New Mexico’s Permian rocks, the footprints of terrestrial vertebrates are widespread and abundant. Reptile and amphibian prints in the Abo and Robledo Mountain formations, for example, are the basis for the recent establishment of Prehistoric Trackways National Monument near Las Cruces in Doña Ana County. This area contains one of the most abundant assemblages of nonmarine Paleozoic trace fossils in the world, with more than 20 different kinds of traces, and it has been called an “ichnofossil Lagerstätte.” (A Lagerstätte is an exceptional fossil deposit.)


2-panel figure showing photos of a fossil vertebrate discovered in the Permian Arroyo de Alamillo Formation of New Mexico. Panel 1: Back end of the animal showing bones of the rear leg and tail. Panel 2: Same specimen with its counterpart.

A fossil vertebrate skeleton (left, close up; right, part and counterpart specimens) discovered by Ron Fields and Emily Thorpe in 2016, Permian Arroyo de Alamillo Formation (Yeso Group), Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument, New Mexico. Left photo, NPS photograph by Emily Thorpe (public domain); right photo, National Park Service, Geologic Resources Division (public domain).


Photograph of a elongated, five-toed footprint in brownish rock on display at a visitor center. In front of the footprint is an impression that might be another footprint. The footprints are Permian in age and may belong to Dimetrodon.

Possible Dimetrodon track, Permian, Prehistoric Trackways National Monument, New Mexico. Photo by Medtrails (Wikimedia, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license, image cropped and resized).

Mesozoic fossils

Mesozoic marine rocks are uncommon in the Basin and Range. While marine environments spread over the area multiple times during the Mesozoic, many of the corresponding rocks have been destroyed by erosion or buried by other sediments.

Outcrops containing marine fossils include the Triassic Moenkopi, Dinwoody, and Thaynes formations; the Jurassic Twin Creek, Carmel, and Curtis formations; and the Cretaceous Aspen-Mowry Shale and Dakota beds. Ammonoids, snails, fish scales, and bivalves are found in these rocks. Rudists (a strange type of bivalve) are uncommon but have been found at a number of Cretaceous localities in New Mexico.


Photograph of a Triassic ammonoid from Utah. The ammonoid shell is spiraling in a single plane. The shell is yellowish brown and the sinuous sutures appear black. The shell is probably about 9 centimeters across (scale bar is 3 centimeters, less than half of shell width.)

Ammonoid (Arctoceras), Triassic Thaynes Limestone, Confusion Range, Millard County, Utah. Photo of YPM IP 591005 by Christina Lutz, 2016 (Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History/YPM, CC0 1.0 Universal/Public Domain Dedication, via GBIF.org).


Photograph of a crowded cluster of small oysters from the Jurassic of Utah. The oysters look like depressions with raised rims. They are grayish in color. Scale bar in corner of photo is 1 centimeter (about the diameter of some of the individual oysters).

Oysters (Liostrea strigilecula), Jurassic Carmel Formation, Utah. Photo by Mark A. Wilson (Wikimedia Commons, CC0 1.0 Universal/Public Domain Dedication).


Photo of a trace fossil of a brittle star from the Jurassic of Utah. The trace is preserved on an orange rock. It is star-shaped with a small central part and long, thin arms. There are traces of 5 arms. Scale bar is 1 centimeter, much smaller than the trace.

Trace fossil of an ophiuroid or brittle star (Asteriacites), Jurassic Carmel Formation, Utah. Photo by Mark A. Wilson (Wikimedia Commons, public domain).


Photograph of a fossil ammonoid from the Cretaceous of New Mexico from two sides. The ammonoid has a shell spiraling in one plane. Scale bar is 1 centimeter (shells probably at least 10 centimeters high.)

In Washington County, in southwestern-most Utah on near the border of the Basin and Range and Colorado Plateau provinces, Early Jurassic rocks are exposed at the St. George Dinosaur Discovery Site. This site preserves an extraordinary diversity and abundance of trackways, as well as the skeletal remains of dinosaurs and other tetrapods, fish, and terrestrial plants.


Photograph of an exhibit at the Dinosaur Discovery Center in Utah. Photo shows the inside of a building where a rock surface preserving dinosaur tracks and ripple marks is enclosed. The dinosaur footprints are marked with a series of small footprint signs. In the background is a reconstruction of a predatory dinosaur.

St. George Dinosaur Discovery Center, Washington County, Utah. Photo by 5of7 (flickr, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license, image resized).


Photograph of a three-toed dinosaur footprint preserved in relief in light brown stone. The footprint is Jurassic in age. Scale bar is 5 centimeters, much shorter than the print.

Dinosaur footprint (Gigandipus), St. George Dinosaur Discovery Center, Early Jurassic Moenave Formation, Utah. Photo by Mark A. Wilson (Wikimedia Commons, public domain).

Cenozoic fossils

Above the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary, the rocks of southeastern and west-central Arizona and central and southern New Mexico are rich in Neogene and Quaternary land mammals. These deposits include proboscideans (relatives of elephants) such as Gomphotherium, Cuvieronius, and Stegomastodon, as well as the American mastodon (Mammut americanum) and at least two species of mammoth (Mammuthus columbi and Mammuthus meridionalis). Also present are camels (Stenomylus, Protolabis, Michenia, Megacamelus, Megatylopus, Hemiauchenia, Procamelus), rhinos (Diceratherium, Teleoceras), carnivores (Borophagus), horses (Dinohippus, Onohippidium, Nannippus, Equus giganteus, E. simplicidens, and E. occidentalis), ground sloths (Megalonyx leptostomus, Glossotherium chapadmalense), and a species of glyptodont (Glyptotherium texanum). There are rabbits and many kinds of rodents, including the earliest known species of porcupine.


Photo of fragments of a jawbone of an extinct canid from the Pliocene of Arizona. Photo shows two pieces of jawbone with pointed teeth. The fragments are about 5 and 7 centimeters long.

Portion of the lower jaw of a fossil canid (Canis lepophagus), Pliocene, Greenell County, Arizona. Photograph of NMMNH 33184 (New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license, image cropped and resized).


Photograph of a portion of the lower jaw of a Pleistocene camel from New Mexico. The photo shows a fragment of jawbone with two or tree teeth; photograph taken from the side, specimen measuring more than 10 centimeters. An inset image is a artistic rending of the camel as it may have appeared in life. It looks similar to a modern camel (long legs, thick body, long curved neck) but lacks a defined hump.

Camel (Camelops hesternus). Photo: Lower jaw, Pleistocene, Catron County, New Mexico. Inset: Reconstruction of the living animal. Photograph of NMMNH 70689 (New Mexico Museum of Natural History & Science, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license, image cropped and resized). Reconstruction by Sergiodlarosa (Wikimedia Commons, Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license, white border added).


White Sands National Park

Pleistocene fossil mammals are found at White Sands National Park of New Mexico. White Sands is a large gypsum deposit in the Tularosa Basin that includes dunes made up of gypsum sand. During the Pleistocene, gypsum eroded from mountains surrounding the Tularosa Basin and collected in an ancient lake on the basin floor called Lake Otero. At the end of the Pleistocene, Lake Otero dried up, leaving behind the gypsum that now forms dunes and the Alkali Flat (a gypsum flat) at White Sands.

Lake Otero probably attracted a variety of animals during the Pleistocene. Herbivores (plant-eaters) like Columbian mammoths, camels, and Harlan's ground sloth, and predators like dire wolves, American lions, and saber-toothed cats lived in the White Sands region. Tracks of several of these animals have been found preserved in the gypsum.

In 2021, an especially exciting discovery was announced: human footprints. The human footprints at White Sands are dated to about 23,000 to 21,000 years old and are the oldest evidence of humans inhabiting North America. 


2-panel image of mammoth prints at White Sands, New Mexico. Panel 1: Photo of mammoth prints. The prints look like shallow circular depressions in flat ground. A broad-brimmed hat and human boot prints indicate the scale of the mammoth prints (they are larger). Panel 2: Close of of a single footprint. The print is circular with a raised edge.

Columbian mammoth (Mammuthus columbi) tracks, Pleistocene, White Sands National Park, New Mexico. Left photo and right photo from NPS, courtesy David Bustos (public domain).


4-Panel image showing Pleistocene human tracks in White Sands, New Mexico. Panel 1: Scientists taking seed sample. Two people are resting on the ground near a shallow hole. There faces are close to the ground, as if they are looking at something. Panel 2: Whitish gypsum flats with several layers that preserve human footprints exposed. The oldest footprints are in a narrow rectangular trench while younger prints are at two higher levels. Arrows are used to indicate the prints. Panel 3: Picture of human footprints on flat ground. The footprints indicate that the humans were barefoot. Panel 4: Four human footprints on flat ground.

Original caption (from USGS): "Top left: USGS research geologists Kathleen Springer and Jeff Pigati collecting seeds embedded in an ancient human footprint for radiocarbon dating. Top right: Multiple human trackways from Track Horizon 1 (white arrows), Track Horizon 3 (red arrows), and Track Horizon 4 (black arrows). Bottom left, right: Closeup photographs of excavated human trackways from Track Horizon 4." Photos by Jeff Pigati and Kathleen Springer, USGS (public domain).

Resources

Resources from the Paleontological Research Institution & partners

Cretaceous Atlas of Ancient Life, Western Interior Seaway (Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Wyoming): https://www.cretaceousatlas.org/geology/

Digital Atlas of Ancient Life Virtual Collection: https://www.digitalatlasofancientlife.org/vc/ (Virtual fossil collection featuring 3D models of fossil specimens sorted by group)

Digital Encyclopedia of Ancient Life: https://www.digitalatlasofancientlife.org/learn/

[email protected]: Earth Science of the South-central United States: Fossils of the Basin and Range (continues coverage of the Basin in Range in far western Texas): https://earthathome.org/hoe/sc/fossils-br

[email protected]: Earth Science of the Western United States: Fossils of the Basin and Range (continues coverage of the Basin and Range in California, Nevada, and Oregon): https://earthathome.org/hoe/w/fossils-br/

[email protected]: Quick guide to common fossils: https://earthathome.org/quick-faqs/quick-guide-common-fossils/


Go to the full list of resources about fossils in the southwestern U.S.

Go to the full list of general resources about fossils